Whistleblower To Congress: 'Non-Human' Biologics Found At UFO Crash Sites

Retired Maj. David Grusch said the U.S. government has been taking part in "a multi-decade UAP crash retrieval and reverse-engineering program."
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A former Air Force intelligence officer told Congress that the U.S. government has a long-standing program that retrieves unidentified flying objects, and said that “non-human” “biologics” were found at crash sites where the objects were recovered.

Retired Maj. David Grusch testified to a House committee Wednesday as part of an investigation into reports of unidentified aerial phenomena.

In 2021, the Pentagon created a group to look into the phenomena after more than 100 sightings were reported. By the following year, the Pentagon said it had received “several hundreds” of new reports of unidentified aerial phenomena. The Pentagon has not confirmed that it has a program to retrieve unidentified flying objects.

Grusch, who served for 14 years as an intelligence officer in the Air Force, told Congress he served as a representative on two Pentagon task forces investigating unidentified aerial phenomena, or UAP, until earlier this year.

In his testimony, Grusch told lawmakers he was informed of “a multi-decade UAP crash retrieval and reverse-engineering program” during the course of his work.

Asked by Rep. Nancy Mace (R-S.C.) if the U.S. government also has the “bodies of the pilots who piloted this craft,” Grusch suggested it might.

“As I’ve stated publicly ... biologics came with some of these recoveries, yeah,” Grusch said.

“Were they human or non-human biologics?” Mace asked.

“Non-human,” Grusch responded. “And that was the assessment of people with direct knowledge of the program I talked to, who are currently still in the program.”

Ryan Graves, executive director of Americans for Safe Aerospace, David Grusch, former National Reconnaissance Office representative on the Defense Department's Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force, and retired Navy Commander David Fravor arrive for House Oversight & Accountability Committee's National Security, the Border, and Foreign Affairs Subcommittee's hearing on "Unidentified Anomalous Phenomena: Implications on National Security, Public Safety, and Government Transparency" at the U.S. Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., July 26, 2023. REUTERS/Elizabeth Frantz
Ryan Graves, executive director of Americans for Safe Aerospace, David Grusch, former National Reconnaissance Office representative on the Defense Department's Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force, and retired Navy Commander David Fravor arrive for House Oversight & Accountability Committee's National Security, the Border, and Foreign Affairs Subcommittee's hearing on "Unidentified Anomalous Phenomena: Implications on National Security, Public Safety, and Government Transparency" at the U.S. Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., July 26, 2023. REUTERS/Elizabeth Frantz
ELIZABETH FRANTZ via Reuters

Grusch said in June that the federal government has multiple crafts of “non-human” origin.

“Well, naturally, when you recover something that’s either landed or crashed, sometimes you encounter dead pilots and, believe it or not, as fantastical as that sounds, it’s true,” Grusch told NewsNation at the time.

Ryan Graves, a former Navy pilot, testified at Wednesday’s hearing that he nearly collided with an unidentified object in 2014. He said in the years since he’s talked to others in the Navy who have described similar experiences.

“We were primarily seeing dark grey or black cubes inside of a clear sphere,” Graves said of the craft he saw. “Where the apex, or tips of the cube, were touching the inside of that sphere.”

Former Navy pilot Dave Fravor testified that he saw a “Tic Tac”-shaped object during a flight off the coast in California in 2004. He and his co-pilot during the incident, Lt. Cmdr. Alex Dietrich, previously spoke to CBS’s “60 Minutes” about the experience, describing that the object appeared to reach speeds so quickly it seemed to disappear.

Fravor told Congress he believes more pilots are reporting their findings now that there is less of a stigma surrounding the existence of unidentified aerial phenomena.

“Starting in 2017, when it all actually came out, it took that stigma away,” Fravor said. “Prior to that, if you had mentioned UAP you’d be laughed off the Hill, and now we’re sitting here today for a public testimony on what’s actually going on.”

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